The works of John Dowland

Lachrimæ or Seaven Teares and other consort music

With the publication of Lachrimæ or Seaven Teares in 1604, Dowland presented English music-lovers with something quite new. Music specifically written for five viols, or violins, and lute had never before appeared ind England.
And never before he wrote for a 9-coursed lute.
The text of the title-page reads:

LACHRIMÆ,
OR SEAVEN TEARES
FIGVRED IN SEAVEN PASSIO-
nate Pauans, with diuers other Pauans, Gali-
ards, and Almands, set forth for the Lute, Viols, or
Violons, in fiue parts:
By Iohn Dowland Bachelor of Musicke, and Lute-
nist to the most Royall and Magnificent, Christian the fourth, King of
Denmarke, Norway, Vandales, and Gothes, Duke
of Sleswicke, Holsten, Stormaria, and Ditmarsh:
Earl of Oldenburge and
Delmenhorst.
Aut Furit, aut Lachrimat, quem non Fortuna beauit.

The first part of the book deals with the 'seven tears'. The remaining part consists of fourteen pieces. Four of these pieces were originally composed for this particular combination of instruments.

Lachrimæ or Seaven Teares and other consort music contains the following 21 pieces: